A Clutter of Cards

[RR] “What’s in your wallet?” Roderick the Rock interrogated Leroy the Lion. “It’s so thick.”

[LL] “Not a Capital One credit card, that’s for sure”, Leroy answered. “I’m still haunted by their annoying David Spade ads.”

[RR] “I can’t even keep my wallet in my back pocket anymore. It’s so full of cards that sitting down would twist my back.”

[LL] “I have plenty of other credit cards though, plus ATM cards, loyalty rewards cards, warehouse club cards, a blood donor card, and a library card… The only thing I don’t have much of in my wallet is money!”

[LL] “But don’t get me wrong. I love cards. I collected baseball cards and other trading cards. I’ve kept every greeting card anyone ever sent me. I use CompactFlash cards and SD cards in my camera and Roku. I usually carry business cards for networking and playing cards for, well, playing.”

[RR] “I’ve seen some pretty cool business cards designed to look like playing cards.”

[LL] “You’re probably worn out with all this card talk, which is precisely the problem with normal playing cards made of plastic-coated cardboard, which don’t last very long before they need to be discarded.”

[RR] “A Brazilian company, Copag, solved that problem over a century1 ago (though over a millennium after playing cards were invented2): completely plastic playing cards. They last practically forever3 with normal usage.”

[LL] “I really like the Copags with the large numbers on them, although I admit that it’s easier to peek at your hole cards with the regular Copags.”

[RR] “We used KEM cards back in college, but now I find them overly expensive and too slippery when they’re new.”

[LL] “Maybe so, but KEM, which has been around since the early 1930s, has been the official playing card of the WSOP since 2007, three years after the U.S. Playing Card Company bought its manufacturing plants and artwork. The colors of KEM cards are definitely brighter, which helps on television.”

{ May 5, 2016 Update: Modiano, an Italian card manufacturer, supplied cards for the WSOP in 2015 but players were not happy with their quality, and Copag is back as the provider for 2016.4 }

Footnotes:

  1. Copag began producing plastic playing cards in 1908.
  2. Playing cards existed by the 9th century (middle of the Tang Dynasty). Ironically, the most famous Chinese card game is now played with tiles. Mah jong is based on a card game created during the Ming dynasty (1368-1644).
  3. Copag claims only that their cards last twenty to fifty times as long as plastic coated playing cards.
  4. CardPlayer published an article on the card switch on May 5, 2016.
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